#1 PRESCRIBED BRAND
FOR HEAD LICE1

HEAD LICE MYTHS AND FACTS

Was your child sent home from school with head lice? Don't bug out!

You're not alone! Between 6 and 12 million US children get head lice each year. While you can’t prevent all infestations, you can be informed about what to do if you encounter one. Here are a few myths and facts about head lice to get you started.2

Sklice Don't Bug Out Imagery
  • MYTH 1

Only dirty children get head lice. FALSE.

Head lice infest children from all backgrounds and walks of life. Anyone can get head lice, no matter how clean their home or hair is or where they live, go to school, or play. All it takes is head-to-head contact with someone who has head lice.2

  • MYTH 2

Head lice are dangerous. FALSE.

Head lice do not carry any diseases. They may cause itching in people who are allergic to head louse bites, which can lead to excessive scratching. This scratching may increase the chances of a secondary skin infection.2

  • MYTH 3

Children who have head lice are always itching. FALSE.

Only some people are allergic to louse saliva, which causes the scalp to itch in some people.2 Minor itching can also be a side effect of some head lice treatments.3

  • MYTH 4

Head lice can live in a mattress or pillowcase for weeks at a time. FALSE.

Because they need to feed on blood to survive, head lice will only live 1 or 2 days away from the human host.2

  • MYTH 5

There’s no reason to involve your doctor if you think your child has head lice. FALSE.

If you think your child has head lice, consider talking with your doctor to confirm the diagnosis and get advice on appropriate treatments. Natural remedies such as homeopathic shampoos that contain sodium chloride 10% may cause stinging when applied, and their effectiveness has not been proven.4

  • FACT 1

Head lice can’t jump, hop, or fly. TRUE.

Head lice crawl quickly from person to person through head-to-head contact.2 However, head lice can be projected from the scalp as a result of static buildup from brushing dry hair.5

  • FACT 2

Head lice don’t spread easily to pillows, furniture, stuffed animals, or clothes, but can remain on them for 1-2 days. TRUE.

If you’re worried:

Machine-wash the items in hot water6

Seal items that can’t be washed in plastic bags for 2 weeks. (This applies only to items that were in contact with your child’s head over the last 24 to 48 hours.2,6)

  • FACT 3

Head lice usually spread through close contact with a person’s head or, less commonly, through sharing things like hats, helmets, scarves, or pillows.6 TRUE.

Close contact with an infested person’s head can occur in unexpected ways, so be alert. For example, squeezing together for group selfies could allow lice to spread from one child to another.

  • FACT 4

You don’t need to shave your child’s head. TRUE.

While effective, it's not always the most practical option.7

  • FACT 5

Home remedies were used to treat head lice in the past.7 TRUE.

There's not clear scientific evidence that says home remedies work as effectively as prescription head lice treatments.3 Chlorine is another unproven home remedy. Even if your child spends all day in the pool, the lice won’t go anywhere; lice can hold their breath for several hours.2 Nowadays, people can make an appointment to discuss treatment options with a physician.

Want to share this information with a friend? Download Head Lice Facts now.

References: 1. Data on file. Arbor Pharmaceuticals, LLC. 2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Frequently asked questions (FAQs). http://cdc.gov/parasites/lice/head/gen-info/faqs.html. Accessed April 25, 2016. 3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Treatment frequently asked questions (FAQs). http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/lice/head/gen-info/faqs_treat.html. Accessed May 31, 2016. 4. West DP. Head lice treatment costs and the impact on managed care. Am J Manag Care. 2004;10(suppl 9):S277-S282. 5. Patient. Checking for head lice. http://patient.info/health/checking-for-head-lice. Accessed June 1, 2016. 6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prevention & control. http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/lice/head-prevent.html. Accessed May 31, 2016. 7. Mazurek CM, Lee NP. How to manage head lice. West J Med. 2000;172(5):342-345.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

To prevent accidental ingestion, adult supervision is required for pediatric application. Avoid contact with eyes.

The most common side effects from Sklice Lotion include eye redness or soreness, eye irritation, dandruff, dry skin, and burning sensation of the skin.

Talk with your doctor if you or your child have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

To prevent accidental ingestion, adult supervision is required for pediatric application. Avoid contact with eyes.

The most common side effects from Sklice Lotion include eye redness or soreness, eye irritation, dandruff, dry skin, and burning sensation of the skin.

Talk with your doctor if you or your child have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


INDICATION:

Sklice Lotion is a prescription medication for topical use on the hair and scalp only, for treatment of head lice in people 6 months of age and older.


ADJUNCTIVE MEASURES:

Sklice Lotion should be used in the context of an overall lice management program:

  • Wash (in hot water) or dry-clean all recently worn clothing, hats, used bedding, and towels.
  • Wash personal care items such as combs, brushes, and hair clips in hot water.

A fine-tooth comb or special nit comb may be used to remove dead lice and nits.


BEFORE USING SKLICE LOTION, TELL YOUR DOCTOR IF YOU OR YOUR CHILD:

  • have any skin conditions or sensitivities
  • have any other medical conditions
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Sklice Lotion can harm your unborn baby.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Sklice Lotion passes into your breast milk.

Please see the full Prescribing Information for Sklice Lotion.